Change the Life of A Child - Become a Foster Carer 

When you become a foster carer, you will care for and nurture the child or young person as a member of your family and be responsible for helping them develop a sense of identity. You will provide safety and stability and be life-long support for them.

Challenge Community Services carefully matches children and young people with foster carers. Carefully matching placements, along with the training and support our foster carers receive from us, ensures the placement has the best chance of stability.

 

Challenge Foster Care in the Hunter Region

Challenge currently has two offices in the Hunter Region. One in Newcastle and one in Maitland. These offices cover the greater Newcastle area, Cessnock, Maitland, Singleton and up to Muswelbrook. 

Not only are the team members professional, experienced and knowledgeable, they pride themselves on getting involved with community as much as possible through volunteering at local charities and supporting local businesses.

Challenge Foster Care focuses on the human connection, on relationships and on people.

You can contact the offices directly on 1800 084 954

 

 

Who can become a foster carer?

We welcome loving foster carers from a variety of family and cultural backgrounds. This includes single people, de facto and married couples, and same-sex couples. Some of our foster carers have never had children, some already have a family.

You don’t need to have a lot of money. It doesn’t matter whether you rent or own your own home, or whether you live in an apartment or house. But you do need to be able to show us that you can provide a secure, stable and loving home. It’s also important that you yourselves are well, healthy and able to deal with the challenges of foster caring. Equally important is that everyone in your home is willing to welcome a child into your family and take part in their care.

 

Deciding to foster

We understand the decision to foster or adopt is a big one. You’ll first need to talk about it with the people close to you. The next step is to contact the Challenge Foster Care team to discuss your situation and your suitability as a foster carer. Once you become a carer you’ll be supported all the way by a dedicated case worker and the Challenge team. 

 

Find out more about Challenge Community Services and foster caring 

Read or download our Carer Handbook.

 

Types of Care 

Providing long-term care

Guardianship. The court grants you guardianship for a child or young person you already know (such as a family member or significant other). You will be responsible for making parental decisions relating to that child or young person without the assistance of a foster care agency.

Foster to adopt. An individual, couple, or family adopts a child or young person who is in their care. As the adoptive parents, you will have the legal rights and responsibility of that child or young person while supporting them to stay connected with their birth family.

Long-term care. A child or young person remains part of your family with ongoing support from Challenge Community Services.

Intensive Therapeutic Care (ITC) step-down care. You care for a child or young person when they are transitioning from an ITC service into a foster placement. ITC is a government-funded program that helps children and young people recover from trauma.

Stepping in for the short-term

If you feel you’re not able to provide permanent care, there are other ways you can make a difference to a child or young person’s life.

Respite care. You provide regular time-limited care to a child or young person, such as on weekends or during school holidays.

Crisis care. A child or young person is placed with you within hours of being referred to Challenge Community Services.

Short-term care and restoration. A child or young person is placed with you for a short period. This can be anywhere from several months to two years. The child or young person may be restored to their family, transitioned into guardianship care, adopted, or transitioned to a long-term foster care arrangement